It all appears to be the start of a blaming game. The pro-Europeans making out that David Cameron has committed a mortal sin by vetoing the change to the EU Treaty, and those anti, heralding the dawn of a big pat on the back for him. Jose Manuel Barroso (European Commission President) saying the protection Cameron requested “would have undermined rules governing EU’ common market”. Nick Clegg is apparently unhappy with the outcome, worried that we have now become ‘isolated’. But ultimately, in the words of Jan Zabradil, Cameron just came to the “defence of his country’s national interests.” And yes, that is all he did. He stood up and said “NO”, when many may not have done so. Since that point, the blaming game, alongside it’s partner – tit for tat commenced, and has embroiled the media ever since. But, nonetheless, in the words of Lord Ashdown, it was a “matter for the Prime Minister”, yet Cameron now appears to be vilified by it (by some), in other words a ‘scape goat!’

To become a scape goat is wholly wrong. Cameron wasn’t to blame for the financial debacle we are now in. To draw it down to this would be a misnomer, for the causes are more complex than this. He is merely dealing with the fall out that is on us. The issue here is one for the Member States that have the Euro currency to tackle. I mean, we don’t ask them to solve any currency issues we may have with the Pound, and if they did, it wouldn’t be right, it would undermine our sovereignty. Hillary Clinton has summarised it aptly:
“Our concern is not over the position that the UK has taken, it’s whether the decision made by the other member of the eurozone countries within the European Union will work.”

At first glance, it would appear that the blatant answer is “No, it hasn’t worked”, but to do so may be slightly premature to say. Let’s see how things play out over the next weeks or so. But no one can deny, the markets are unsettled and damagingly wavering. The blame game is merely a distraction and an unwelcomed one at that! Don’t you think it is a waste of time and counterproductive? This time is precious and needs to be spent wisely, dealing with the crisis, and saying “by March” is not good enough!

So, what needs to be done? The answer is glaringly obvious: the Member States in agreement have to settle down to the nitty-gritty, day and night, and finalise their unified solution. For ultimately, failure is not an option, as it will lead to another downward spiral, and how much more we can take is strongly debatable. If they fail, it will reflect badly on them, and could lead to the fall of the Euro currency. Cameron’s name may crop up along the way, but nonetheless, it would be them and not us (to continue the blaming game! hahaha)

The situation would be a lot different had Britain’s currency been the Euro. If it had then the stance taken by Cameron could have been grave, but alas it isn’t the case. For us now to go back to Europe with our begging bowls for forgiveness (like the media portray Clegg as wanting) would be an embarrassment and unnecessary. A decision has been made and we all have to move on and not live in the past, as it has been an gone, whereas the financial crisis has not.

So please, please, please, Europe get your priorities right, and get your act together! By all means, in a comfortable position in the future let the historians debate this day, but don’t start it now, as we aren’t history, we are present!

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